zReportage - Amazing Stories from Around the World
share
| about | 1:57 PST
 GO
TUESDAY January 18, 2022: 'COST OF PEACE: Taliban Style' from award winning photographer Adrien Vautier of Le Pictorium: Since the Taliban swept back to power in Afghanistan in August, they have been enforcing their fundamentalist interpretation of Islam. In spite of trying to rebrand as more moderate, the group has imposed a slew of restrictions that revoke the liberties that Afghan women have won through a history of struggle and activism, and unravel the gains made over the past two decades. Most secondary schools for girls were closed, and women were prohibited from working in most government jobs and many other areas. The Taliban beat and detained journalists; many media outlets closed or drastically scaled back their reporting, partly because many journalists had fled the country. The new Taliban cabinet included no women and no ministers from outside the Taliban's own ranks. Last week the United nations asked donors for $4.4 billion in humanitarian aid for Afghanistan in 2022 to ensure the country's future after a period of turmoil marked by the Taliban's seizure of power. The U.N. says the appeal, which amounts to nearly a quarter of the country's GDP, is the largest ever sought for a single country and is triple the figure it received in 2021 when the U.S.-backed government collapsed. Western sanctions aimed at the Taliban also prevented the passage of basic supplies of food and medicine, although this has since eased. Welcome to 'COST OF PEACE: Taliban Style'
© Story of the Week #822: TUESDAY January 18, 2022: 'COST OF PEACE: Taliban Style' from award winning photographer Adrien Vautier of Le Pictorium: Since the Taliban swept back to power in Afghanistan in August, they have been enforcing their fundamentalist interpretation of Islam. In spite of trying to rebrand as more moderate, the group has imposed a slew of restrictions that revoke the liberties that Afghan women have won through a history of struggle and activism, and unravel the gains made over the past two decades. Most secondary schools for girls were closed, and women were prohibited from working in most government jobs and many other areas. The Taliban beat and detained journalists; many media outlets closed or drastically scaled back their reporting, partly because many journalists had fled the country. The new Taliban cabinet included no women and no ministers from outside the Taliban's own ranks. Last week the United nations asked donors for $4.4 billion in humanitarian aid for Afghanistan in 2022 to ensure the country's future after a period of turmoil marked by the Taliban's seizure of power. The U.N. says the appeal, which amounts to nearly a quarter of the country's GDP, is the largest ever sought for a single country and is triple the figure it received in 2021 when the U.S.-backed government collapsed. Western sanctions aimed at the Taliban also prevented the passage of basic supplies of food and medicine, although this has since eased. Welcome to 'COST OF PEACE: Taliban Style'
The Afghan youth seem sometimes divided when the Taliban came to power. Some are really worried about their future, while others are rather satisfied with the order that now reigns.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
The Taliban invited local and international journalists to an event to promote education among women in the Emirate. Dozens of female students wearing full body covering black Niqab (burka) are present in the amphitheater of the polytechnic university.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
MALAWI QUDRATULLAH HAMZA governor of Balkh province sits at his desk, with armed guards nearby, in Mazar-e Sharif, the capitol of the province.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
An Afghan woman wearing a burka caries a child in the streets of mazar-e Sharif in northern Afghanistan. Since taking power the Taliban have imposed rights-violating policies that have created huge barriers to women's and girls' health and education.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
SORAYA, 25, begs on the road between Mazar-e Sharif and Kabul. She has to take care of her two nephews after the death of her brother. The UN estimates that nearly 23 million people are at risk right now for potentially life-threatening hunger in Afghanistan.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
At the private Avicenna University in Kabul, a curtain now separates boys and girls in mixed classes enforced by the now Taliban-run Ministry of Education. The last time the Taliban were in power, from 1996 to 2001, women and girls were banned from education and work. After the militants were removed in 2001, women were free to go to university and jobs.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
A huge black and white mural symbolizing the Taliban flag was painted on the American embassy wall in Kabul. The country's new leaders are omnipresent in the streets of the capital.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Marching and holding paper signs stating 'Not To Kill The Innocent People of Panshir' as Afghan women answer the call for a national uprising in the streets of Kabul. They have just been chased away in front of the Pakistani embassy, which is trying to intimidate them with shots in the air.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
A young girl waits for her father to take the picture the end of the day in Kabul. At this popular viewpoint above the city, citizens and Taliban come to admire the view and take souvenir photos.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Young Taliban fighters discover the thrill rides at Kabul amusement park for the first time. The citizens are sometimes frightened to find them here, the moment of relaxation turns into fear. The Taliban say they are adopting a more moderate approach to daily life in Afghanistan. But evidence points to continued human rights violations.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Young Taliban fighters put down their weapons and enjoy ice cream at an amusement park in Kabul. Only a few places of entertainment have not yet been closed by the Taliban, such as the zoo and the amusement park. Most of the young Taliban visit such a places of entertainment for the first time in their lives.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Taliban fighters come to enjoy themselves at the Kabul Zoo. The Taliban say they are adopting a more moderate approach to daily life in Afghanistan. But evidence points to continued human rights violations.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
WAHID BADNAM, 53, is an accordion, harmonium and guitar repairman in Kabul. The Taliban's stance on music forbids people from enjoying and participating in cultural activities, and violates the UN International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Standing with some of his fighters, MOHAMMAD HAMED SARHADI, 29, commands a Taliban base in Kabul.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
The owners of beauty salons have covered with paint the large pictures of women's faces on their shop windows. the Taliban have imposed rights-violating policies that have created huge barriers to women’s and girls’ health and education, curtailed freedom of movement, expression, and association, and deprived many of earned income.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Taliban fighters with weapons ride in the back of a pickup in Mazar-e Sharif. The area was historically aligned with Commander Massoud's Northern Alliance, the country's new Taliban leaders are everywhere.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
RAHMATULLAH EZATI, 48, is head projectionist of the Ariana cinema in Kabul. Ezati knows that he risks a lot if the Taliban find the films he hides there. 'I'm afraid they won't let me explain my job to them and that they will kill me for no reason.' The cinema, which was closed because it was forbidden by Sharia law, had already been destroyed when the Islamists took power in 1996.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Dozens of female students wearing Niqab are present in the amphitheater of the polytechnic university to support the fundamentalists' policy after the Taliban invited local and international media to an event to promote education among women in the Emirate.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
TAQI DARYABI, 22, a journalist based in Kabul, he was arrested by the Taliban during a demonstration, at the police station he was put in an empty room, with his hands tied behind his back, and for 15 minutes he was beaten on the head with sticks, cables and pipes. His comrade Nematullah Naqdi suffered the same fate, they were released after several hours in the cell. Despite the promises of the Taliban, the freedom of the press is dying out in Afghanistan. The leaders of the country have issued ''rules of journalism'', which all media must follow. The first three points of the rules require not to broadcast subjects contrary to Islam.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
SUDABA is a women's rights activist in Kabul. The Taliban have imposed rights-violating policies that have created huge barriers to women's and girls' health and education, curtailed freedom of movement, expression, and association, and deprived many of earned income. Afghanistan's rapidly escalating humanitarian crisis exacerbates these abuses.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Armed Taliban fighters visit the estate of 'Bala Bagh', a former holiday resort of the Afghan royalty. It was built by Emir Abdur Rahman Khan in 1893 as a place for him to spend summers in, and he later died there in 1901.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Students at a madrassa, an Islamic religious school in the Paghman district. In this Pashtun region from which the Taliban originate, the war was long. Stigmatized by the Afghan army, many civilians died because of the bombings, or caught in the crossfire.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
These 4 women are Afghan feminist activists in Kabul and want to continue the fight for their rights as long as it is possible. From L to R, twin sisters ZARIFA an engineering student and SUDABA who is currently unemployed since the arrival of the Taliban. TAIBA works at Farah's clothing store, and FARIDA is an economics student.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
TAHMINA USMANI, 22, is the only female presenter of the Afghan news channel Tolo News. When the Taliban took power, the media lost 90% of its journalists. Tolo News employees have to follow the new rules imposed on them, and according to them, they still have a certain freedom of expression.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
In Kabul girls attend a class at a secret school. Secondary education has not yet resumed for girls, so some teachers and students have decided to overcome their fear, and take the risk of setting up classrooms in private homes.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
In Herat, the clinic of Medecins Sans Frontieres cares for malnourished babies. More than one child out of five treated in the clinic does not survive due to hunger. The UN estimates that nearly 23 million people are at risk right now for potentially life-threatening hunger, which is why last week, U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres issued an urgent plea to the international community for $5 billion in humanitarian aid to help Afghans.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire
Drug users at an addict detoxification center in Kabul. After coming to power in Afghanistan, the Taliban vowed to crack down on widespread drug addiction in the country.
© Adrien Vautier/Le Pictorium via ZUMA Press Wire Wire
Adrien Vautier

Adrien Vautier studied photography at the Gobelins school in Paris. Today, Vautier shoots for Le Pictorium Agency and mainly works with magazines and newspapers, covering social subjects around the world. Adrien is available for assignment via ZUMA Press.:822



HELP