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TUESDAY July 21, 2020: THE INVISIBLE MAN by ZUMA Press Photographer Svetlana Bachevanova: extraordinary Bulgarian photojournalist. 2001 emigrated to USA. 2010, launched FotoEvidence, a NGO supporting the role photojournalists play, with a book publishing award. Svetlana gives us, a personal view of her sons life saving isolation under coronavirus. VLADI, 40, was five years old when he was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Thirty-three when he lost 70% of his vision and 37 when he went through a kidney transplant, requiring him to take immunosuppressant drugs daily for the rest of his life. He takes an additional eight different medications and will remain quarantined until a vaccine is developed. With the arrival of Covid-19 the threat has become lethal and pervasive. His only interactions are with his family, the local pharmacist and his doctors. One in five people around the world could be at risk of developing a severe case of Covid-19, an international team of scientists has estimated. Since the beginning of the outbreak, health authorities around the world have agreed that people with chronic illnesses are most prone to developing severe or fatal symptoms of the coronavirus, meaning 1.7 billion people around the world, or 22% of the global population, are at 'increased risk.' Welcome to: THE INVISIBLE MAN
© zReportage.com Story of the Week #746: TUESDAY July 21, 2020: THE INVISIBLE MAN by ZUMA Press Photographer Svetlana Bachevanova: extraordinary Bulgarian photojournalist. 2001 emigrated to USA. 2010, launched FotoEvidence, a NGO supporting the role photojournalists play, with a book publishing award. Svetlana gives us, a personal view of her sons life saving isolation under coronavirus. VLADI, 40, was five years old when he was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Thirty-three when he lost 70% of his vision and 37 when he went through a kidney transplant, requiring him to take immunosuppressant drugs daily for the rest of his life. He takes an additional eight different medications and will remain quarantined until a vaccine is developed. With the arrival of Covid-19 the threat has become lethal and pervasive. His only interactions are with his family, the local pharmacist and his doctors. One in five people around the world could be at risk of developing a severe case of Covid-19, an international team of scientists has estimated. Since the beginning of the outbreak, health authorities around the world have agreed that people with chronic illnesses are most prone to developing severe or fatal symptoms of the coronavirus, meaning 1.7 billion people around the world, or 22% of the global population, are at 'increased risk.' Welcome to: THE INVISIBLE MAN
VLADI, 40, has a suppressed immune system due to a kidney transplant that saved his life three years ago. Since the surgery Vladi, has been vulnerable, avoiding large crowds and close contact to avoid exposure to infections. With the arrival of Covid-19 the threat has become lethal and pervasive. In the picture Vladi is behind the screen on his window to the world.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
May 30, 2020, Marseillan, Herault, France; VLADI sits in his room, where he spends most of his day listening music and reading electronic books. Due to Covid-19 he has to be very careful about his exposure to other people.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
One of the consequences of diabetes is neuropathy, a powerful pain in his legs that makes his walks difficult. A van passes Vladi on the road while he is on his 2 mile morning tour of the village, enjoying the early sun and empty streets.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
VLADI on his early morning walk, a 2 mile tour of the village. One of the consequences of diabetes is neuropathy, a powerful pain in his legs that makes his walks difficult.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
VLADI, walking on the streets late in the evening to avoid crowds. Since his transplant surgery 3 years ago, Vladi has been vulnerable, avoiding close contact with people to avoid infections.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
VLADI behind the window in his room where he spends most of his days. With Covid-19 and since his transplant surgery Vladi is vulnerable, and must shun crowds and close contact to avoid infections.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
Vladi views an old picture on his cellphone of him kissing his fiance. The coronavirus quarantine found them in two different countries and now they communicate only online. He hopes to see her soon after travel between countries in Europe is allowed.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
Silhouette of VLADI, 'The invisible Man' during one of his walks on the streets in the late evenings to avoid crowds. He wears a mask even when there is nobody around. Because he rarely goes out and only with a face covering some people in his small neighborhood don't know him as they have not seen his face without a mask.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
Early in the morning to avoid crowds VLADI collects his monthly supply of medications from the local pharmacy. His only interactions are with his family, the local pharmacist and his doctors.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
One in five individuals worldwide are now in an increased risk of severe COVID-19 due to underlying health conditions and will remain quarantined until a vaccine is developed. Vladi, 40, is one of them. He was five years old when he was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Thirty-three when he lost 70% of his vision and 37 when he went through a kidney transplant, requiring him to take immunosuppressant drugs daily for the rest of his life. He takes an additional eight different medications.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
VLADI is changing the insulin in his pump that delivers the missing hormone to his body to regulate his blood sugar. Taking care of his medical needs takes a lot concentration and time.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
VLADI is monitoring his insulin pump, attached to his body to regulate his blood sugar. One in five individuals worldwide are in increased risk of severe COVID-19 due to an underlying health condition and will remain quarantined until a vaccine is developed.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
One of VLADI' s windows to the world are his books. With 70% impaired vision he cannot read physical books but enlarging the letters on a tablet allows him the joy of reading.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
Sometimes VLADI walks in the evening near the port of Marseillan where people are enjoying restaurants and coffee shops after the initial coronavirus restrictions. He wears a mask and keeps his distance.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
VLADI walking on the streets late in the evening to avoid crowds. Since his transplant surgery Vladi has been vulnerable, avoiding large crowds and close contact to avoid infections. With the arrival of Covid-19 the threat has become lethal and pervasive.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
Vladi leaves his house key and protective gloves on the table. With the arrival of Covid-19 the threat of coronavirus Vladi has been self isolating and only goes out for short walks or to the pharmacy and for doctors office visits.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
VLADI'S stepfather DAVID is teaching him an energizing yoga practice. Since his transplant surgery VLADI has been avoiding large crowds and close contact with people. His only interactions are with his family, the local pharmacist and his doctors. He meets his fiance and friends only online.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
One of VLADI' s windows to the world are his books. With 70% impaired vision he cannot read physical books but enlarging the letters on a mobile device allows him the joy of reading.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
Every week VLADI meets his podiatrist DENIS BOULANGER in the nearby city of Sete. His long term diabetes has damaged the nerves of his feet, he doesn't feel any pain and is also slow to heal. A wound that appeared six years ago is still under treatment for an infection that could spread very fast if his feet are not monitored weekly.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
At the port of Marseillan, VLADI watches from a distance, the boats and the tourists who are flooding the village after France lifted some coronavirus restrictions.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
One of the consequences of diabetes is neuropathy, a powerful pain in his legs that makes his walks difficult. VLADI is on his 2 mile morning tour of the village, enjoying the early sun and empty streets.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
VLADI behind the window in his room where he spends most of his days. Since his transplant surgery Vladi has been vulnerable, avoiding large crowds and close contact to avoid infections. With the arrival of Covid-19 the threat has become lethal and pervasive.
© Svetlana Bachevanova/ZUMA Wire
Svetlana Bachevanova

Svetlana is a long time photojournalist and the publisher at FotoEvidence, a publishing house and activist organization that supports documentary photography focused on human rights and social justice. Svetlana became a photojournalist during the transition from dictatorship to democracy in her native Bulgaria. Passionate about social justice she joined the first democratic newspaper 'Democrazia,' documenting the end of a long lasting Communist regime. For seven years she served as the chief photographer for the newspaper. In 1997 Svetlana moved on to become the first woman chief photographer for the Bulgarian News Agency. In 2001, Svetlana moved to New York where she and her partner David Stuart founded FotoEvidence in the tradition of using photography to draw attention to injustice, oppression and assaults on human dignity wherever they may occur. FotoEvidence is now internationally recognized as a premier publisher of documentary photography and an active partner with human rights organizations.:746



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