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TUESDAY July 26, 2022: 'AFROMESTIZO Illuminating the Invisible' by award winning ZUMA Press Photographer Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez: The annual ‘Carnaval' festival has dug its roots into grounds worldwide and Mexico is no different, where several small towns take pride in the country's African roots, identifying as an 'Afromestizo.' These celebrations were brought to the America's by the Spanish and Portuguese from the 15th century, it is said that they have pagan origin, with participants wearing colorful capes and animal masks, of bulls, deer, goats and cows giving a unique expression of African-Mexican folk art. Welcome to: AFROMESTIZO Illuminating the Invisible'
© zReportage.com Story of the Week #846: TUESDAY July 26, 2022: 'AFROMESTIZO Illuminating the Invisible' by award winning ZUMA Press Photographer Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez: The annual ‘Carnaval' festival has dug its roots into grounds worldwide and Mexico is no different, where several small towns take pride in the country's African roots, identifying as an 'Afromestizo.' These celebrations were brought to the America's by the Spanish and Portuguese from the 15th century, it is said that they have pagan origin, with participants wearing colorful capes and animal masks, of bulls, deer, goats and cows giving a unique expression of African-Mexican folk art. Welcome to: AFROMESTIZO Illuminating the Invisible'
Wearing a bull mask with horns and cape a resident of the town of Alto Tio Diego celebrates Afromestizo carnival. This carnival is more than 100 years old and was created by the African slaves who came to these lands during the Colonial times.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Wire
Wearing a bull mask and floral headdress a member of the community of Coyolillo walks up a flight of bright pink stairs during the Afro-descendant carnival.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Wire
Dressed as a small clown and standing in a wood working shop, a resident of the town of Teocelo in Veracruz dress gets ready for the parade to celebrate the Holy Burial of Christ.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Traditional dancers of the ''Santiagos'' in colorful costume and masks during the patron saint festival in honor of Saint Peter.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Wearing a deer mask with antlers and cape a resident of the town of Alto Tio Diego celebrates Afromestizo carnival. This carnival is more than 100 years old and was created by the African slaves who were brought to these lands during the Colonial times.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Wire
Wearing colorful masks and costumes, hundreds of local residents walk the streets of the community of Baxtla, in Veracruz, to celebrate the patron saint festivities of the Virgen de la Visitacion.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Dressed in traditional costume and floral headdress, a 'bonetero,' the main character of the Afro-Mestizo Carnival in the town of Tuzamapan, stands in a brightly painted green kitchen of a local home.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Wearing traditional capes and masks, people from Almolonga in the state of Veracruz, celebrate their carnival dressed in their traditional bull masks. This carnival is one of the oldest in the region and dates back to the time when African slaves revealed themselves against Europeans in these lands.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Wire
With floral and cape and wearing a deer mask with antlers, a resident of the town of Alto Tio Diego celebrates the traditional Afro-Mexican carnival. This is a tradition that has been celebrated since the colonial era of Mexico.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
A family stand in-front of their home, as hundreds of participants walk the streets of the community of Baxtla, in Veracruz, to celebrate the patron saint festivities of the Virgen de la Visitacion. Many participants dress as clowns and dance around a floral arch with the image of the virgin Mary.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Standing against a yellow painted wall a resident of the town of Alto Tio Diego wears an animal mask and cape to celebrate the traditional Afro-Mexican carnival. Participants wear wooden masks in the form of cows, bulls, or horses.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Wearing a bull mask and floral headdress a member of the community of Coyolillo celebrates during the Afro-descendant carnival. This carnival has more than 100 years of history and is the heritage of the African workers who arrived in that area more than 300 years ago.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Wire
Standing proudly in her living room, Lady VICTORIA NESTOR, is the 'Queen of the Carnival' of the Tamales in Yecuatla, in the state of Veracruz.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Wearing animal mask and floral cape, a resident of the community of Coyolillo celebrate their Afro-descendant carnival. This carnival has more than 100 years of history and is the heritage of the African workers who arrived in that area more than 300 years ago to work in the sugar cane fields.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Wire
Dressed in traditional costume and floral headdress, a 'bonetero,' the main character of the Afro-Mestizo Carnival in the town of Tuzamapan, during the celebration.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Traditional dancers of the ''Santiagos'' dance perform their steps during the patron saint festival in honor of Saint Peter.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Residents of the town of Alto Tio Diego celebrate the traditional Afro-Mexican carnival. Participants wear wooden masks in the form of animals such as cows, bulls, horses and other costumes. This is a tradition that has been celebrated since the colonial era of Mexico.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Standing in the street next to a foraging pig, a resident of the town of Alto Tio Diego celebrates the traditional Afro-Mexican carnival while wearing a traditional animal mask and colorful cape.
© Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez/ZUMA Press Wire
Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez

Born in Mexico in 1990, Hector Adolfo Quintanar Perez considers himself a self titled 'Ethno-Photographer.' Hector is dedicated to creating images of cultural expressions, looking for photography to be a visual tool in the academic and anthropological language. His work is available via ZUMA Press.:846



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