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TUESDAY March 29, 2022: 'Wartime Innocents' by all time Pulitzer Prize (4 times) winning, ZUMA Press photo-journalist CAROL GUZY. Russia's war in Ukraine has displaced some 4.3 million children in the past month, more than half of the country's estimated 7.5 million child population, according to UNICEF. The figure includes 2.5 million children who are internally displaced inside Ukraine, and more than 1.8 million who have crossed into neighboring countries as refugees. The ongoing conflict has created one of the fastest large scale displacements of children since World War II, UNICEF Executive Director Catherine Russell said. The war is taking a toll on Ukraine's kids. This is a grim milestone that could have lasting consequences for generations to come,'' Russell added. ''Children's safety, well being and access to essential services are all under threat from non-stop horrific violence.' Overall, the war has displaced 1 in 4 Ukrainians. Ten million people have left their homes since Russia invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24, with more than 3.6 million refugees fleeing to neighboring countries. Welcome to 'Wartime Innocents'
© zReportage.com Story of the Week #832: TUESDAY March 29, 2022: 'Wartime Innocents' by all time Pulitzer Prize (4 times winning, ZUMA Press photo-journalist CAROL GUZY. Russia's war in Ukraine has displaced some 4.3 million children in the past month, more than half of the country's estimated 7.5 million child population, according to UNICEF. The figure includes 2.5 million children who are internally displaced inside Ukraine, and more than 1.8 million who have crossed into neighboring countries as refugees. The ongoing conflict has created one of the fastest large scale displacements of children since World War II, UNICEF Executive Director Catherine Russell said. The war is taking a toll on Ukraine's kids. This is a grim milestone that could have lasting consequences for generations to come,'' Russell added. ''Children's safety, well being and access to essential services are all under threat from non-stop horrific violence.' Overall, the war has displaced 1 in 4 Ukrainians. Ten million people have left their homes since Russia invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24, with more than 3.6 million refugees fleeing to neighboring countries. Welcome to 'Wartime Innocents'
Two young girls holding hands walk past armed guards, as displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol and other besieged cities evacuate through Zaporizhia. Russia's war in Ukraine has displaced some 4.3 million children in the past month, more than half of the country's estimated 7.5 million child population, according to UNICEF.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Hands showing where her cancer effected her. Octogenarian Ukrainian lady Ms. TAISIYA GEORGIEVNA TARASOVA, 82, remained in her home, as the Russian attack rages. Living alone now, in her apartment, in her nation's besieged capital. Taisiya receives food and medicine from a group of local residents that formed a humanitarian network to deliver supplies to the elderly and infirm left behind.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Artur and Natalia from Sartana, Donetsk region and their children SASHA, VOVA and Katya wait at a transit aid station as displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol evacuate in battered cars with white strips of cloth and signs saying 'Children' through Zaporizhia. The family traveled in a car with 11 people and their dog for six days to escape the fighting.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
A Ukrainian man fights back tears as displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol evacuate with children through Zaporizhia.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Artur and Natalia from Sartana, Donetsk region and their three children SASHA, VOVA and KATYA wait at a transit aid station in Zaporizhia. Displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol evacuate in battered cars with white strips of cloth and signs saying 'Children' taped to windshields. The family traveled in a car with 11 people and their dog for six days to escape.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
People pay respects during a funeral for two fallen soldiers, Mykola Dmytrovych and Roman Fedorovich at Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Starychi. The soldiers were killed in a Russian airstrike at International Center for Peacekeeping and Security military base in Yavariv, close to the Polish border.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
ARTUR from Sartana, Donetsk region waits at a transit aid station in Zaporizhia as displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol evacuate in battered cars with white strips of cloth and signs saying 'Children' taped to windshields. Artur's family traveled in a car with 11 people and their dog for six days to escape.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Refugee TANYA LYAPINA weeps with her hands covering her eyes as displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol evacuate in battered cars covered with white strips of cloth and signs saying 'Children' as they drive through Zaporizhia region. The refugee exodus is the largest in Europe since WWII.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol evacuate in battered cars with white strips of cloth and signs saying 'Children,' during the Russian invasion of Ukraine.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
An elderly lady stands outside her home and pays her respects during a funeral for two fallen soldiers, Mykola Dmytrovych and Roman Fedorovich in Starychi. The emotional service was followed by a procession through the town and burial was at a local cemetery.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol evacuate in battered cars with white strips of cloth and signs saying 'Children' through Zaporizhia.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol evacuate in battered cars with white strips of cloth and signs saying 'Children' through Zaporizhia, Ukraine.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Refugees on a train carriage fleeing the Russian invasion evacuate through the central train station in Lviv. Ten million people have left their homes since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, with more than 3.6 million refugees fleeing to neighboring countries.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Women, children and other displaced people fleeing the Russian invasion cross the train tracks and evacuate through the central train station in Lviv. The ongoing conflict has created one of the fastest large scale displacements of children since World War II.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Women with young children and other displaced people fleeing the Russian invasion evacuate through the central train station in Lviv. Ten million people have left their homes since Russia invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24, with more than 3.6 million refugees fleeing to neighboring countries.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Donated shoes wait for new owners at a transit center as displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol and other besieged cities evacuate through Zaporizhia.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Displaced people fleeing desperately brutal conditions of the Russian invasion of Mariupol and other besieged cities evacuate through the train station at Zaporizhia.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
A young girl blows bubbles as people shelter from rocket attacks in a metro station serving as an underground bomb shelter in Kyiv, during the Russian invasion.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
YERUKHIMOVICH NADIYA PANASIVNA, 89 years old, had been bedridden for three months and life was altered at her apartment in Kyiv, as the Russian invasion continues. Sounds of airstrikes on the outskirts of the city echo on her walls and a shelling recently hit the neighborhood. All her life she worked on a vegetable farm and from the hard work she now has the bone condition osteochondrosis and a fall broke her thigh. Her son Misha, 54. has not evacuated in order to care for his mother who is unable to travel. He is concerned about a lack of medicine, especially painkillers.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Octogenarian Ms. TAISIYA GEORGIEVNA TARASOVA, 82, and her cat in better times. Taisiya remained in her home, as the Russian attack rages. Living alone now, in her apartment, in her nation's besieged capital as the Russian invasion reaches a full month. Taisiya receives food and medicine from a group of local residents that formed a humanitarian network to deliver supplies to the elderly and infirm left behind. 'I am not afraid', she stated, but didn't evacuate because she has health issues related to stomach cancer. There are no more relatives to care for her. Once eight lived in the apartment but now portraits of her children and loved ones line the walls where she sits alone with her memories.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Greeting a rare visitor at her door in her otherwise ghost town of an apartment building. TAISIYA GEORGIEVNA TARASOVA, 82, who remained in her home, as the Russian attack rages. After three surgeries for cancer she has lost almost half her body weight and is frail like a tiny bird but her spirit remains intact.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Carol Guzy

CAROL GUZY is an American documentary photojournalist. As a young girl, ZUMA Press photographer, Carol Guzy always wanted to be an artist. But as she was coming of age in a working-class family in Bethlehem, Pa., such an ambition seemed impossible. ''Everyone I knew said, 'Oh, if you're an artist, you'll starve,''' she recalls. ''You have to do something really practical.''' So Guzy chose to go to nursing school. Halfway through she realized she would not, could not, be a nurse. ''I was scared to death I was going to kill someone by making some stupid mistake,'' she laughs. So while she was trying to figure out what to do with her life, a friend gave her a camera and she took a photography course. Guzy fascination with photography led to an internship and then a job at the Miami Herald. In 1988 she moved to The Washington Post. Carol photographs have won four Pulitzer Prizes and three Photographer of the Year awards in the National Press Photographers' annual contest. ''I don't believe the Pulitzers belong to us, I think we just accept them for the people who are in our stories,'' said Guzy. ''They're the courageous ones.'' From her shots of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti to Albanian refugees fleeing violence in Kosovo, Guzy captures moments of disaster and human suffering:832



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