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TUESDAY November 30, 2021: 'LAVA LAND’ by ZUMA Press award winning photographer Kike Rincon of Contacto, who is currently in The Canary Islands covering this magnificent and dangerous volcanic event: The 2021 Cumbre Vieja eruption began September 19, 2021 at 15:12 local time, as a flank eruption at the Cumbre Vieja volcanic ridge comprising the southern half of the Spanish island of La Palma in the Canary Islands. It is the first volcanic eruption on the island since the eruption of Teneguía in 1971. The lava stream has engulfed 2,800 acres of land and the eruption has damaged or destroyed nearly 2,700 buildings, forcing the evacuation of thousands from their homes. The volcano was under strict surveillance after more than 22,000 tremors were reported in one week, an indication of a pending eruption, which continues today with new lava vents opening up. The volcanic action has also become a tourist attraction. People have flocked to La Palma to watch the bright red flames as they shoot hundreds of feet into the sky. Scientists have said the latest eruption could last up to three months. Welcome to ‘LAVA LAND'
© Story of the Week #816: TUESDAY November 30, 2021: 'LAVA LAND’ by ZUMA Press award winning photographer Kike Rincon of Contacto, who is currently in The Canary Islands covering this magnificent and dangerous volcanic event: The 2021 Cumbre Vieja eruption began September 19, 2021 at 15:12 local time, as a flank eruption at the Cumbre Vieja volcanic ridge comprising the southern half of the Spanish island of La Palma in the Canary Islands. It is the first volcanic eruption on the island since the eruption of Teneguía in 1971. The lava stream has engulfed 2,800 acres of land and the eruption has damaged or destroyed nearly 2,700 buildings, forcing the evacuation of thousands from their homes. The volcano was under strict surveillance after more than 22,000 tremors were reported in one week, an indication of a pending eruption, which continues today with new lava vents opening up. The volcanic action has also become a tourist attraction. People have flocked to La Palma to watch the bright red flames as they shoot hundreds of feet into the sky. Scientists have said the latest eruption could last up to three months. Welcome to ‘LAVA LAND'
The Cumbre Vieja volcano erupts blowing lava high into the sky. An earthquake swarm started under Cumbre Vieja on September 11, 2021. It slowly migrated to the surface, with earthquakes up to around 3.5 on the Richter scale and over 22,000 recorded. On September 19th at 15:12 local time, the volcano started erupting.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
The Cumbre Vieja volcano looms over El Paso, a few days after the initial eruption. The lava coming out of the volcano has covered a total of 166 hectares and has already destroyed 350 buildings, according to satellite monitoring of the Copernicus program of the European Union.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A home burns as the river of lava from the Cumbre Vieja volcano sweeps through the area on its way to the ocean. At least 15 homes are destroyed by the eruption and more than 5,000 people have been evacuated so far.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
Lava from the volcano seen from El Paso in this timed exposure. The Government of the Canary Islands has made an initial estimate of the damage caused by the Cumbre Vieja volcanic eruption at between 550 and 700 million euros.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A huge wall of lava from the Cumbre Vieja volcano spills over and into the swimming pool of a home in La Palma.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A surge of lava destroyed around 100 homes on Spain's Canary Islands a day after a volcano erupted, forcing 5,000 people to leave the area. The Cumbre Vieja volcano erupted on Sunday, sending vast plumes of thick black smoke into the sky and belching molten lava that oozed down the mountainside on the island of La Palma.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A horse on a farm in Tacande de Abajo, while the Cumbre Vieja volcano in La Palma expels lava and pyroclasts after hours of relative inactivity.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A wall of molten lava from the volcano crosses a road near Los Llanos. The volcanic eruption began yesterday when seismic activity on the island of La Palma had reached the maximum. At least 15 homes are affected by the eruption and more than 5,000 people have been evacuated.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A group of people watch the lava flow and pyroclasts coming out of the Cumbre Vieja volcano in La Palma. The volcanic action has also become a tourist attraction. People have flocked to La Palma to watch the bright red flames as they shoot hundreds of feet into the sky.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A woman from the village Todoque cries during the evacuation of her house in the Cumbre Vieja volcano exclusion zone. The approach of lava to the town of Todoque is imminent and the residents must leave their homes with their belongings in the next few hours.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
Flights are cancelled and the La Palma airport remains inoperative due to the accumulation of ash from the Cumbre Vieja volcano, just a few days after the initial eruption.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A fireman removes evacuated residents belongings from a home in the town of Todoque, as the river of lava from the Cumbre Vieja volcano continues to advance towards the sea.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
Several operators observe the lava and check for toxic gas at the former summit of Cumbre Vieja volcano in the municipality of La Laguna, during a visit to the exclusion zones.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
Ash clouds, glowing lava and lightening fill the sky over the volcano in this timed exposure, seen from Los Llanos de Aridane.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
The lava ash covered cemetery of Las Manchas sits inside the exclusion zone of the Cumbre Vieja volcano. The people who lived in this area of Las Manchas had to leave their homes after the eruption on September 19.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A policeman stands near where lava from the Cumbre Vieja volcano reached a house in the municipality of La Laguna.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
ANNABEL originally from Germany, greets her 25-year-old donkey 'Sancho,' in the temporary shelter for farm animals. 'Sancho' together with Annabel's five-year-old goat 'Mona' were rescued from Porto Naos. The shelter houses about 700 animals evacuated from the exclusion zone after the eruption of the 'Cumbre Vieja' volcano.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
The Cumbre Vieja volcano expels lava and pyroclasts into the sky far above street lights in the town of Cabeza de Vaca.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
The Cumbre Vieja volcano shoots glowing lava high into the night sky, four days after the initial eruption.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
CARLOS GODOY, 32, from Colombia his face covered in ash, rests after working the banana harvest in Tazacorte. La Palma relies heavily on the cultivation and export of the banana crops, 50% of its GDP comes from this fruit and many local families depend directly on its cultivation.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A farmer wearing a mask and protective overalls collects bananas covered in ash, on a farm in Fuencaliente. La Palma is second only to Tenerife for its banana production, an important local crop. Around 50% of the islands GDP comes from export sales of this fruit.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
JACOB, a banana farmer, smokes a cigarette with his face covered with ash after a day harvesting bananas, on his farm in Fuencaliente. Within the archipelago, La Palma is second only to Tenerife for its banana crop, with 50% of its GDP coming from sales of the fruit. More than 5.300 producers harvest bananas and almost 10,000 local families depend directly on its cultivation.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A lava dust covered playground in an exclusion zone of Las Manchas, Canary Islands where residents had to leave their homes after the initial eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcano on September 19.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
People walk under umbrellas as a shower of ash falls on Santa Cruz de La Palma, during the volcanic eruption of Cumbre Vieja. So far almost 6,000 residents evacuated and about 400 buildings and infrastructure damaged or lost.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A woman sweeps up the volcanic ash that has 'rained' down from the Cumbre Vieja volcano onto the houses and streets of Los Llanos de Aridane.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
New lava flows from Cumbre Vieja volcano push up against homes in the community of La Laguna.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
Volunteers work to remove thick volcanic ash from the roofs of several houses near the Cumbre Vieja volcano. Many of the workers come from nearby municipalities, others come from outside the archipelago to help. The air quality is especially poor in these areas affected the volcano.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
Lava flows from the Cumbre Vieja volcano, passing banana farms and over the former beach of Puerto Naos into the sea. The landing craft (LCM) of the Spanish Navy Amphibious Assault Ship 'Castilla', began to evacuate farmers from areas affected by the eruption of the volcano.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
Lava flow from the Cumbre Vieja volcano, passes homes in Los Llanos de Aridane as it makes its way to the ocean. During the night the cone of the volcano partially collapsed and has produced a new overflow of the lava lake, with the formation of waterfalls falling from the crater.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
A group of tourists on a boat photograph the volcanic eruption from the port of Tazacorte. Volcano tourism has overwhelmed La Palma as people come to see the spectacle.
© Kike Rincon/Contacto via ZUMA Press
Kike Rincon

Kike Rincon is a photojournalist with Contacto agency in Spain. Kike's work is published regularly in national newspapers, such as El Pais, El Mundo, La Razon, El Diario.es, Hola, Cuatro and La Sexta, and The Guardian. Kike has published several books dedicated to the Madrid Debate Forum, made up of politicians, historians, chroniclers, journalists and businessmen. Kike's images are available via ZUMA Press.:816



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