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September 26, 2021: 'DANCING IN THE RUBBLE Part Four Wounded, Not Broken' by ZUMA Pulitzer Prize Photographer Carol Guzy who was in Haiti witnessing first hand the situation, Guzy received her fourth Pulitzer for her searing coverage of the Haitian earthquake back in 2010: A massive 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti at 8:29 AM EDT on August 14, 2021. It affected a large area of rural southwestern provinces, killing at least a confirmed 2,250 people and injuring 12,000, leaving the Caribbean Island nation in the grip of yet another humanitarian crisis. On good days, life is desperately hard in Haiti. Tragedy befalls the country repeatedly. Political anarchy, gang violence, natural disasters and endless floods. In 2010 a massive quake killed over 300,000 people in Port-au-Prince. Ten years later the island country still hadn't recovered when the earth trembled again and life for so many was again eternally altered. But for most Haitians it's not about dying in the quake but rather living in the rubble of shattered lives and altered destinies where the legendary Haitian resilience survives. They mourn, pray then move on with the task of living. The town of Maniche is a teeth-rattling bumpy drive from Les Cayes where approximately 90% of buildings were destroyed or damaged. Yet hope endures in the wounded landscape. Welcome to: 'DANCING IN THE RUBBLE Part Four Wounded, Not Broken'
© Story of the Week #805: September 26, 2021: 'DANCING IN THE RUBBLE Part Four Wounded, Not Broken' by ZUMA Pulitzer Prize Photographer Carol Guzy who was in Haiti witnessing first hand the situation, Guzy received her fourth Pulitzer for her searing coverage of the Haitian earthquake back in 2010: A massive 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti at 8:29 AM EDT on August 14, 2021. It affected a large area of rural southwestern provinces, killing at least a confirmed 2,250 people and injuring 12,000, leaving the Caribbean Island nation in the grip of yet another humanitarian crisis. On good days, life is desperately hard in Haiti. Tragedy befalls the country repeatedly. Political anarchy, gang violence, natural disasters and endless floods. In 2010 a massive quake killed over 300,000 people in Port-au-Prince. Ten years later the island country still hadn't recovered when the earth trembled again and life for so many was again eternally altered. But for most Haitians it's not about dying in the quake but rather living in the rubble of shattered lives and altered destinies where the legendary Haitian resilience survives. They mourn, pray then move on with the task of living. The town of Maniche is a teeth-rattling bumpy drive from Les Cayes where approximately 90% of buildings were destroyed or damaged. Yet hope endures in the wounded landscape. Welcome to: 'DANCING IN THE RUBBLE Part Four Wounded, Not Broken'
A massive 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti at 8:29 AM EDT on August 14, 2021. It affected a large area of rural southwestern provinces, killing at least a confirmed 2,250 people and injuring 12,000. Countless families were displaced, leaving the Caribbean Island nation in the grip of yet another humanitarian crisis.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
MARTINE FONTUS, 26 years old, copes with the aftermath of a massive earthquake as she grieves the loss of her mother in her damaged home in peril of collapse with dangerous aftershocks in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
MARTINE FONTUS, 26 years old, copes with the aftermath of a massive earthquake as she grieves the loss of her mother in her damaged home in peril of collapse with dangerous aftershocks in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
MONTIHIEL HUBERT's brow is furrowed as he copes with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche. He stands at a neighbor's damaged house as he digs through the rubble for anything to sell. He works for 175 gourdes, less than USD $2 per day caring for 5 children as he awaits aid.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
This aerial view shows homes in a street some still standing and many completely destroyed as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
A street vendor sets up shop under a colorful umbrella and offers goods to passersby as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Life must go on, children run through the street past damaged buildings as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
YOLETTE MOISE, 70 years old, cleans debris from her home with a small shovel and determination as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche. Yolette didn't know her age and searched through belongings to find an ID card with her birth date.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
YOLETTE MOISE, 70 years old, cleans debris from her home with a small shovel and determination as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche. Yolette didn't know her age and searched through belongings to find an ID card with her birth date.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
YOLETTE MOISE, 70 years old, cleans debris from her home with a small shovel and determination as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche. Yolette didn't know her age and searched through belongings to find an ID card with her birth date.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
The family of Yolette Moise, 70 years old, rests after a meal while she cleans debris from her home with a small shovel and determination as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche. Yolette didn't know her age and searched through belongings to find an ID card with her birth date.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
YOLETTE MOISE, 70 years old, cleans debris from her home with a small shovel and determination as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche. Yolette didn't know her age and searched through belongings to find an ID card with her birth date.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Children play the street with large cracks as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
An elderly woman in a pink dress walks with a cane down a street filled with rubble as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
'I'm obligated to stay here because I have no place to go,' said Darline Jean sitting infant of her damaged home. She copes with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in her damaged home in peril of collapse with dangerous aftershocks in Maniche. 'I feel like someone dead.'
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
'I'm obligated to stay here because I have no place to go,' said Darline Jean in her heavily damaged and dangerous home. She copes with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in her damaged home in peril of collapse with dangerous aftershocks in Maniche. 'I feel like someone dead.'
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
In the rain a motorcycle on a rubble filled street as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
JOCELINE MATURIN and her daughter FDELIONE, 12 years old, sit amid the rubble of their home as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Survivor PAUL JEAN BASKIN searches through the rubble of his home for anything he can retrieve as he copes with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche. He has nowhere to go and couldn't fight with other desperate residents for a tent handed out by aid groups since he is elderly and frail.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Pink slippers placed on the rubble. 'I'm obligated to stay here because I have no place to go,' said Darline Jean. She copes with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in her damaged home in peril of collapse with dangerous aftershocks in Maniche Haiti. 'I feel like someone dead
© August 22, 2021, Maniche, Haiti: Pink slippers placed on the rubble. 'I'm obligated to stay here because I have no place to go,' said Darline Jean. She copes with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in her damaged home in peril of collapse with dangerous aftershocks in Maniche Haiti. 'I feel like someone dead
Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche. As life goes on, women have their hair done amid the rubble of damaged buildings.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
A baby sleeps in the rubble of a home, as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche. After earthquake struck countless families were displaced, leaving the Caribbean Island nation in the grip of yet another humanitarian crisis.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Workers pull down dangerous collapsed buildings as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Rescue workers in hard hats ride in a pickup truck as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Men collect old steel rebar to sell for recycling, as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Men collect old steel rebar to sell for recycling, as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
A survivor stands among rubble and damaged buildings as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
A JCB digger sits beside a rubble filled street as Haitians cope with the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Maniche.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press Wire
Carol Guzy

CAROL GUZY is an American documentary photojournalist. As a young girl, ZUMA Press photographer, Carol Guzy always wanted to be an artist. But as she was coming of age in a working-class family in Bethlehem, Pa., such an ambition seemed impossible. ''Everyone I knew said, 'Oh, if you're an artist, you'll starve,''' she recalls. ''You have to do something really practical.''' So Guzy chose to go to nursing school. Halfway through she realized she would not, could not, be a nurse. ''I was scared to death I was going to kill someone by making some stupid mistake,'' she laughs. So while she was trying to figure out what to do with her life, a friend gave her a camera and she took a photography course. Guzy fascination with photography led to an internship and then a job at the Miami Herald. In 1988 she moved to The Washington Post. Carol photographs have won four Pulitzer Prizes and three Photographer of the Year awards in the National Press Photographers' annual contest. ''I don't believe the Pulitzers belong to us, I think we just accept them for the people who are in our stories,'' said Guzy. ''They're the courageous ones.'' From her shots of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti to Albanian refugees fleeing violence in Kosovo, Guzy captures moments of disaster and human suffering:805



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