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TUESDAY July 13, 2021: 'TOKYO TODAY: United by Emotion!' by ZUMA Award winning Photographer Joe McNally whose career has taken him on assignment to 70 countries, here McNally gives us a unique preview of TOKYO 2020 and what will likely be one of the most controversial games ever: After a yearlong postponement due to the coronavirus pandemic, the 2020 olympic Games are set to kick off later this summer in Tokyo, despite the ongoing spread of COVID-19 and lingering concerns in Japan. Though the games will be taking place in 2021 due to the postponement, they will continue to be officially branded as the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Public opinion polls in japan charted strong opposition to the event, but at this point the games reportedly cost Japan about 5 billion, making them the most expensive ever. Japan has banned all foreign spectators from attending any of the events, and domestic spectators will be under strict limitations. Against the professional advice of many doctors and public-health officials, the 2020 Olympics will kick off on July 23, 2021. Welcome to 'TOKYO TODAY: United by Emotion!'
© zReportage.com Story of the Week #794: TUESDAY July 13, 2021: 'TOKYO TODAY: United by Emotion!' by ZUMA Award winning Photographer Joe McNally whose career has taken him on assignment to 70 countries, here McNally gives us a unique preview of TOKYO 2020 and what will likely be one of the most controversial games ever: After a yearlong postponement due to the coronavirus pandemic, the 2020 olympic Games are set to kick off later this summer in Tokyo, despite the ongoing spread of COVID-19 and lingering concerns in Japan. Though the games will be taking place in 2021 due to the postponement, they will continue to be officially branded as the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Public opinion polls in japan charted strong opposition to the event, but at this point the games reportedly cost Japan about 5 billion, making them the most expensive ever. Japan has banned all foreign spectators from attending any of the events, and domestic spectators will be under strict limitations. Against the professional advice of many doctors and public-health officials, the 2020 Olympics will kick off on July 23, 2021. Welcome to 'TOKYO TODAY: United by Emotion!'
ALICE IWAMOTO, 29, a movie stunt woman and martial arts specialist, flies in a fighting pose in a bamboo forest outside Tokyo. Alice is emblematic of the growing numbers of female martial artists being recognized in Japan.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
A rainy Tokyo night as pedestrians make their way along Kabukicho, a classic street for theaters, bars, massage parlors and home of legendary, bright, colors and neon display signs.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Sumo wrestlers in action during a major competition in Tokyo at the Ryogoku Kokugikan Sumo Center for competition. Sumo is absolutely emblematic of traditional Japanese sporting competition. Hugely popular, the leading sumo wrestlers are treated as stars, almost god-like, in Japan.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
The Robot Restaurant in downtown Tokyo is a pop culture fest, showing monsters, lasers, and dancers, with reflective costumes. It became emblematic over time with the Japanese fascination for the melding of technology and pop culture. It has been closed due to the the pandemic.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Practitioners of the traditional sport of Japanese archery, called Kyudo. It has been around in Japanese culture since pre-history. It has a ritual aspect to it as it involves a three, four or five fingered gloves, and distinctive bow. The archers, called kyudoka, follow a very prepared ritual prior to shooting the arrow.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
A mass of early morning commuters crowds the platform at Shinjuku Station waiting for rush hour trains in Tokyo.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Gymnast YUKIO IKETANI, 50, flies up in the air with Mt. Fuji in background. IKETANI is a legendary gymnast in the history of Japanese Olympic sports and scored two bronze medals in the Seoul Olympics, and again scored a silver and bronze in Barcelona Games. Iketani is widely recognized as a primary, historically important Japanese athlete.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Commuters on the streets and the subway in the busy Shinjuku area on a rainy night in Tokyo.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
YUMEKA ODA, 14, a leading skateboarder in Japan, in action at Komazawa Park, a big attraction for young skateboarders in Japan. Skateboarding will make its debut as a medal sport in Tokyo 2021.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Young YUMEKA ODA, 14, is one of the leading young skateboarders in all of Japan and an Olympic hopeful. Oda sits amidst 'monsters' at the Kawaii Monster Cafe in Tokyo, a youth oriented fun and fantasy shop and eatery. Skateboarding will make its debut as a medal sport in Tokyo 2021.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
KEYAKI IKE, 22, a super skateboarder in Japan, takes flight at Komazawa Park. Skateboarding will have its debut as a medal sport in Japan Olympics, 2021.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Overhead motion blur of Shibuya Crossing in downtown Tokyo. It is called 'The Scramble' and more pedestrians cross here on an average day than virtually anyplace else in the world. Very popular in movies, and for tourists to pose here with the crowds.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
ALICE IWAMOTO, 29, a martial artist and movie stunt woman, poses quietly in a bamboo forest outside of Tokyo. Alice is amongst the women who are forging a path in the male dominated movie stunt business in Japan.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
The Sensoji Temple in Tokyo is hugely popular, where many faithful go with incense sticks (joss sticks) and try to gather the smoke over themselves. It is believed that the smoke from the incense burner has restorative and healing powers.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
HIROTO OHARA, 21, at the breakwater of Tsurigasaki Beach in Ichinomiya where the Olympic competition in surfing will be held. OHARA trains here daily and will compete for Japan in surfing. The sport is making its Olympic debut in 2021 as a medal event.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
In Roppongi, master chef YUTAKA UEDA, known as 'master' at Ichioku Restaurant practices tai-chi with his kitchen pans. He started it in 1968. The translation means '100 Million' and around that time Japan's population crossed 100 million. Ueda wanted to feed the people and make 100 million yen. Big dreams that match the drive and energy in Tokyo.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Practitioners of the traditional sport of Japanese archery, called Kyudo. It has been around in Japanese culture since pre-history. It has a ritual aspect to it as it involves a three, four or five fingered gloves, and distinctive bow. The archers, called kyudoka, follow a very prepared ritual prior to shooting the arrow.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Typical scene inside a bar in Tokyo's Golden Gai bar district which is populated with incredibly tiny bars, the area is a beacon of Tokyo nightlife.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Beach soccer star OZU MOREIRA, 35, at 'artificial beach' called Tachihi Beach, where the team trains. OZU is very typical of the phenomenon occurring in current Japanese sporting culture. Ozu is Brazilian born, but now a Japanese citizen, and plays and coaches Japanese beach soccer, and is the first Japanese player to score over 100 international goals. Ozu is the player-manager of the Japanese national team. at 'artificial beach' called Tachihi Beach, where the team trains.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
A young sumo wrester, KOJI IKEDA, loads up on food at a sushi bar in Tokyo. Young sumos have to bulk up to wrestle their massive opponents.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Fun scenes from sumo training school. A shift in Japanese sports is occurring in that young girls are being allowed to train as sumos.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
ASUMA NAKAI, 21, rides his BMX bike up a wall in a Tokyo skate park in downtown Tokyo. He is a very prominent BMX biker on the Japanese scene, but will not be representing Japan at the Games.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
ASUMA NAKAI, 21, carrying his bike it in downtown Tokyo, is a very prominent BMX biker on the Japanese scene.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
SAYURI OSUGA, 40, poses on her bike amidst the commuter crowds of the 'Shibuya Scramble.' OSUGA is one of the very few athletes to have ever represented Japan in both the summer games (cycling) and the winter games (speed skating).
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
A commuter on a bicycle wearing a face mask, crosses train tracks glowing in the early morning light.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Rugby is another sport symbolic of the shift in the Japanese sporting culture, as its national clubs have numerous non-Japanese born players. Rugby has grown popular in Japan, and its national team has been ranked as high as 7th in the world. This competition here is between Shining Arcs (NTTCOM) and Blues (Munakata Sanix) held at Yume no Shima Stadium.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
Tokyo rush hour crowds moving around the busy Shinjuku area, past traffic in the rain. Tokyo always has a bright feel with the night time street lights, but on rainy nights it can have a feel similar to a futuristic sci fi movie.
© Joe McNally via ZUMA Press Wire
JOE MCNALLY

Joe McNally is an American photographer who has been shooting for the National Geographic Society since 1987. He is based out of New York City and resides in Ridgefield, Connecticut. He has won four awards from World Press Photo. Joe is available for assignments through ZUMA Press.:794



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