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Launched TUESDAY December 25, 2018 on www.zReportage.com Story #690: ODYSSEY of HOPE by CAROL GUZY for ZUMA Press: STORY SYNOPSIS: JONATAN MATAMOROS, his wife SARA ARTIAGA and their son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA from Honduras endured many hardships on their journey to the United States; a frigid river crossing, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico and hunger. ''We suffered and were hungry. No one told us the risks.'' says Jonathan. On December 16, 2018 they made a spontaneous decision to cross the U.S./Mexico border with others to be detained. They were seen crossing by a photojournalist who said they looked quite sad, possibly realizing their chances of gaining asylum were slim and hopes for a future in America would most likely result in deportation to the country they spent so many months fleeing.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Nov 20, 2018 - Mexicali, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitched a ride with others from migrant caravan that had stopped to rest in Mexicali. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to Centro Deportivo Benito Juarez shelter in Tijuana where they spent their first day at camp waiting in hopes of crossing the border to America. The next day America celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday. They started their journey October 12 with the caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered and were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but happy and excited to reach the border and he is grateful that having his wife and son with him provide joy.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Nov 20, 2018 - Mexicali, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitched a ride with others from migrant caravan that had stopped to rest in Mexicali. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to Centro Deportivo Benito Juarez shelter in Tijuana where they spent their first day at camp waiting in hopes of crossing the border to America. The next day America celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday. They started their journey October 12 with the caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered and were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but happy and excited to reach the border and he is grateful that having his wife and son with him provide joy.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Nov 20, 2018 - Mexicali, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 kisses his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitch a ride with others from migrant caravan that had stopped to rest in Mexicali. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to a shelter in Tijuana where they will wait in hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but happy and excited to reach the shelter. He said having his wife and son with him provide joy. They arrived in Tijuana the day before America celebrates the Thanksgiving holiday.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Nov 20, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitch a ride with others from migrant caravan that had stopped to rest in Mexicali. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to Centro Deportivo Benito Juarez shelter in Tijuana where they spent their first day at camp waiting in hopes of crossing the border to America. The next day America celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday. They started their journey October 12 with the caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered and were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but happy and excited to reach the border and he is grateful that having his wife and son with him provide joy.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Nov 20, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitched a ride with others from migrant caravan on November 20, 2018 that had stopped to rest in Mexicali, Mexico. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to Centro Deportivo Benito Juarez shelter in Tijuana where they spent their first day at camp waiting in hopes of crossing the border to America. The next day America celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday. They started their journey October 12 with the caravan.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Nov 21, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitched a ride with others from migrant caravan that had stopped to rest in Mexicali, Mexico. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to Centro Deportivo Benito Juarez shelter in Tijuana where they spent their first day at camp waiting in hopes of crossing the border to America. The next day America celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday. They started their journey October 12 with the caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered and were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but happy and excited to reach the border and he is grateful that having his wife and son with him provide joy.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Nov 21, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitched a ride with others from migrant caravan that had stopped to rest in Mexicali. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to Centro Deportivo Benito Juarez shelter in Tijuana where they spent their first day at camp waiting in hopes of crossing the border to America. The next day America celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday. They started their journey October 12 with the caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered and were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but happy and excited to reach the border and he is grateful that having his wife and son with him provide joy.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Nov 21, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitched a ride with others from migrant caravan that had stopped to rest in Mexicali, Mexico. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to Centro Deportivo Benito Juarez shelter in Tijuana where they spent their first day at camp on November 21, 2018 waiting in hopes of crossing the border to America. The next day America celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Nov 21, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitched a ride with others from migrant caravan that had stopped to rest in Mexicali, Mexico. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to Centro Deportivo Benito Juarez shelter in Tijuana where they spent their first day at camp on November 21, 2018 waiting in hopes of crossing the border to America. The next day America celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Nov 21, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras hitched a ride with others from migrant caravan that had stopped to rest in Mexicali. They endured the cold wind as they drove through La Rumorosa mountain road to Centro Deportivo Benito Juarez shelter in Tijuana where they spent their first day at camp on November 21, 2018 waiting in hopes of crossing the border to America. The next day America celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday. They started their journey October 12 with the caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered and were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but happy and excited to reach the border and he is grateful that having his wife and son with him provide joy.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 6, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras stay at El Barretal shelter in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions. Yet most of the migrants maintained a positive attitude, saying why cry when they can laugh. Children played amid the garbage and dirty floors. SARA and the baby had planned to be detained as they prepared for an attempt to cross border but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. They originally came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but holding onto hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 6, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Food lines. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras stay at El Barretal shelter in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions. Yet most of the migrants maintained a positive attitude, saying why cry when they can laugh. Children played amid the garbage and dirty floors. SARA and the baby had planned to be detained as they prepared for an attempt to cross border but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. They originally came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but holding onto hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 6, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Food lines. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras stay at El Barretal shelter on in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions. Yet most of the migrants maintained a positive attitude, saying why cry when they can laugh. Children played amid the garbage and dirty floors. SARA and the baby had planned to be detained as they prepared for an attempt to cross border but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. They originally came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but holding onto hopes of crossing the border to America.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 7, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - SARA looks at a phone with many pictures of her son and husband, many from Honduras. They met when he walked past her home and thought she was beautiful, basically love at first sight. She thought he was beautiful too. The phone was lost after attempt to cross border along with all their photo memories. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras stay at El Barretal shelter on December 7, 2018 in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 7, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN shows a phone with many pictures of his beloved SARA and son, many from Honduras. He met her walking past her home and thought she was beautiful, basically love at first sight. She thought he was beautiful too. The phone was lost after an attempt to cross border along with all their photo memories. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras stay at El Barretal shelter in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 7, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras stay at El Barretal shelter in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions. Yet most of the migrants maintained a positive attitude, saying why cry when they can laugh. Children played amid the garbage and dirty floors. SARA and the baby had planned to be detained as they prepared for an attempt to cross border but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. They originally came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but holding onto hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN kisses SARA goodbye before boarding a bus to La Playa to search for possible places to cross border with his family soon. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras stay at El Barretal shelter on December 8, 2018 in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions. Yet most of the migrants maintained a positive attitude, saying why cry when they can laugh. Children played amid the garbage and dirty floors. SARA and the baby had planned to be detained as they prepared for an attempt to cross border but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. They originally came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but holding onto hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN on a bus to La Playa to search for possible places to cross border with his family soon. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras stay at El Barretal shelter on December 8, 2018 in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions. Yet most of the migrants maintained a positive attitude, saying why cry when they can laugh. Children played amid the garbage and dirty floors. SARA and the baby had planned to be detained as they prepared for an attempt to cross border but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. They originally came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but holding onto hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 checks possible places to cross border at La Playas de Tijuana. He took buses from Barretal shelter for migrant caravan Central Americans to the area to seek places to cross to the U.S. eventually with his wife and child. He looks at Tijuana-San Diego border, the U.S. so close yet so far. He and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old are now staying at Barretal shelter where they will wait in hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but having his wife and son with him provide joy and determination to reach America.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 checks possible places to cross border at La Playas de Tijuana. He took buses from Barretal shelter for migrant caravan Central Americans to the area to seek places to cross to the U.S. eventually with his wife and child. He looks at Tijuana-San Diego border, the U.S. so close yet so far. He and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old are now staying at Barretal shelter where they will wait in hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but having his wife and son with him provide joy and determination to reach America.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 checks possible places to cross border at La Playas de Tijuana. He took buses from Barretal shelter for migrant caravan Central Americans to the area to seek places to cross to the U.S. eventually with his wife and child. He looks at Tijuana-San Diego border, the U.S. so close yet so far. He and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old are now staying at Barretal shelter where they will wait in hopes of crossing the border to America.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 checks possible places to cross border at La Playas de Tijuana Mexico but became afraid when he saw Mexican security there. He took buses from Barretal shelter for migrant caravan Central Americans to the area to seek places to cross to the U.S. eventually with his wife and child. He looks at Tijuana-San Diego border, the U.S. so close yet so far. He and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old are now staying at Barretal shelter where they will wait in hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across a river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but having his wife and son with him provide joy and determination to reach America.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Private security take photos of each other at border.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 sits near the border fence at La Playas de Tijuana. He took buses from Barretal shelter for migrant carsvan Central Americans to the area to look for possible places at the border to cross to the U.S. eventually with his wife and child. He was just having fun at Playas de Tijuana border, looking towards San Diego, so close yet so far. He said he could climb fence so his friend dared him and he quickly scaled it. He could have gone over as CBP was not on U.S. side at the time, but his wife and child were at shelter. He and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old are now staying at Barretal shelter where they will wait in hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but having his wife and son with him provide joy.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 climbs the border fence at La Playas de Tijuana Mexico. He took buses from Barretal shelter for migrant carsvan Central Americans to the area to look for possible places at the border to cross to the U.S. eventually with his wife and child. He was just having fun at Playas de Tijuana border, looking towards San Diego, so close yet so far. He said he could climb fence so his friend dared him and he quickly scaled it. He could have gone over as CBP was not on U.S. side at the time, but his wife and child were at shelter. He and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old are now staying at Barretal shelter where they will wait in hopes of crossing the border to America.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 climbs the border fence at La Playas de Tijuana . He took buses from Barretal shelter for migrant carsvan Central Americans to the area to look for possible places at the border to cross to the U.S. eventually with his wife and child. He was just having fun at Playas de Tijuana border, looking towards San Diego, so close yet so far. He said he could climb fence so his friend dared him and he quickly scaled it. He could have gone over as CBP was not on U.S. side at the time, but his wife and child were at shelter. He and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old are now staying at Barretal shelter where they will wait in hopes of crossing the border to America.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 8, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 lies near he border fence at La Playas de Tijuana. He took buses from Barretal shelter for migrant carsvan Central Americans to the area to look for possible places at the border to cross to the U.S. eventually with his wife and child. He was just having fun at Playas de Tijuana border, looking towards San Diego, so close yet so far. He said he could climb fence so his friend dared him and he quickly scaled it. He could have gone over as CBP was not on U.S. side at the time, but his wife and child were at shelter. He and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old are now staying at Barretal shelter where they will wait in hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN. Now they are tired but having his wife and son with him provide joy.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 7, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - SARA gives medicine to the baby for a persistent cough. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras stay at El Barretal shelter on December 7, 2018 in overcrowded, unsanitary conditions. Yet most of the migrants maintained a positive attitude, saying why cry when they can laugh. Children played amid the garbage and dirty floors. SARA and the baby had planned to be detained as they prepared for an attempt to cross border but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. They originally came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but holding onto hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 9, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 (in tent) with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old (upper middle) from Honduras pack a few things from their tent at Barretal shelter. They and about a dozen others from the shelter make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 9, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, with wife from Honduras and about a dozen others from the Barretal shelter to make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 9, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Waiting for the bus to border. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras leave Barretal shelter. They and about a dozen others from the shelter spend hours on buses to make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 9, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Taking the bus to border. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras leave Barretal shelter. They and about a dozen others from the shelter spend hours on buses to make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 9, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Taking the bus to border. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras leave Barretal shelter on December 9, 2018. They and about a dozen others from the shelter spend hours on buses to make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 9, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Hiding near the border, SARA changes the baby's diapers and clothes. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras leave Barretal shelter on December 9, 2018. They and about a dozen others from the shelter spend hours on buses to make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/Zuma Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 9, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras left Barretal shelter and rest on the cold ground as they hide near border. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife with about a dozen others from the shelter make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 9, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Hiding as they rush to the border fence. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras leave Barretal shelter. They and about a dozen others from the shelter spend hours on buses to make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 10, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - SARA with baby on right and her friend hiding at border fence. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras left Barretal shelter. They and about a dozen others from the shelter make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Wire/ZUMAPRESS.COM
Dec 10, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Peeping through a hole in the border fence hoping CBP agents were on change of shifts but their vehicle never left. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras left the Barretal shelter. They and about a dozen others from the shelter make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 10, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Giving up crossing the border. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras left the Barretal shelter. They and about a dozen others from the shelter make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry. No one told us the risks,'' said JONATAN.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Dec 10, 2018 - Tijuana, Mexico - Giving up crossing the border. JONATAN MATAMOROS, 36 and his wife SARA ARTIAGA, 31 with their infant son JOSE MIGUEL ARTIAGA, 18 months old, from Honduras left Barretal shelter on December 10, 2018. They and about a dozen others from the shelter make an attempt in the darkness of night to cross Tijuana-San Diego border near Playas de Tijuana. Eventually after a long night in the bitter cold, lying on rocks and hiding from helicopters, they reached the border but were afraid to cross since a Customs and Border Protection vehicle was parked on the other side. The women and children had planned to be detained but JONATAN thought he could run fast enough to escape past agents. As they walked away from their dreams, SARA said with despair ''I'm going back to my home Honduras, it's too dangerous here.'' They came with the migrant caravan and have been waiting in shelters in Tijuana in limbo, trying to decide what to do but with hopes of crossing the border to America. They started October 12 on their journey with caravan. They said they swam across the river, walking and hitchhiking through Mexico. ''We suffered, were hungry.
© Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press
Carol Guzy

CAROL GUZY is an American documentary photojournalist. As a young girl, ZUMA Press photographer, Carol Guzy always wanted to be an artist. But as she was coming of age in a working-class family in Bethlehem, Pa., such an ambition seemed impossible. ''Everyone I knew said, 'Oh, if you're an artist, you'll starve,''' she recalls. ''You have to do something really practical.''' So Guzy chose to go to nursing school. Halfway through she realized she would not, could not, be a nurse. ''I was scared to death I was going to kill someone by making some stupid mistake,'' she laughs. So while she was trying to figure out what to do with her life, a friend gave her a camera and she took a photography course. Guzy fascination with photography led to an internship and then a job at the Miami Herald. In 1988 she moved to The Washington Post. Carol photographs have won four Pulitzer Prizes and three Photographer of the Year awards in the National Press Photographers' annual contest. ''I don't believe the Pulitzers belong to us, I think we just accept them for the people who are in our stories,'' said Guzy. ''They're the courageous ones.'' From her shots of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti to Albanian refugees fleeing violence in Kosovo, Guzy captures moments of disaster and human suffering:690



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