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Salaryman
     David Tesinsky/ZUMA (bios)
For years they would go out drinking with colleagues and clients, returning home drunk at 2am before rising at dawn to head back to the office. That is how the 'salaryman' became the corner stone of modern Japan, the white-collar worker who helped create the world's second-largest economy after WWII. But the 'Salaryman' a term coined in the 1920's, is now becoming a figure of the past, due to a generational shift. This fact has huge implications in a country in which the company is the dominant institution in people's lives, and affects Japanese society as a whole. The salaryman system has buckled under the strains on the Japanese economy. Government figures in 2014 revealed that Japan's population shrank for the third year running, with the elderly comprising 25% of the total for the first time. The proportion of people aged 65 or over is predicted to reach nearly 40% of the population in 2060, the government has warned. Having lost over half a million people in the past two years and with projections of at least a 50 percent decline in the population through the end of this century, Japan sits at the leading edge of population change beginning in other parts of East Asia as well as Europe.
Salaryman
     David Tesinsky/ZUMA (bios)
For years they would go out drinking with colleagues and clients, returning home drunk at 2am before rising at dawn to head back to the office. That is how the 'salaryman' became the corner stone of modern Japan, the white-collar worker who helped create the world's second-largest economy after WWII. But the 'Salaryman' a term coined in the 1920's, is now becoming a figure of the past, due to a generational shift. This fact has huge implications in a country in which the company is the dominant institution in people's lives, and affects Japanese society as a whole. The salaryman system has buckled under the strains on the Japanese economy. Government figures in 2014 revealed that Japan's population shrank for the third year running, with the elderly comprising 25% of the total for the first time. The proportion of people aged 65 or over is predicted to reach nearly 40% of the population in 2060, the government has warned. Having lost over half a million people in the past two years and with projections of at least a 50 percent decline in the population through the end of this century, Japan sits at the leading edge of population change beginning in other parts of East Asia as well as Europe.